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Elements: An Engineering Simulation Blog

Serving the engineering simulation community and ANSYS and Rocky DEM users by sharing news, workshops, seminars, training, webinars, tips & tricks, and more.
Oct
22

Test vs analysis? Better yet, both!

Rolf Orsagh, Testing Services Manager - Strain Gage InstallationRolf Orsagh
Testing Services Manager
Strain Gage Installation
Most of you know us as your ANSYS software and service provider. While ANSYS certainly represents the focus of our business, it’s not all that we do. Another way we serve our clients is through our physical testing team.

Our physical test team has worked not only across North America, but throughout Europe and Asia and with many industry sectors. For example, our testing experts were key in developing and deploying a digital twin model employed on a turbine for a Middle Eastern power plant.

Given that most of you work mainly with simulation, why are we bringing testing to your attention?

A goal of simulation is to reduce physical prototype testing, but physical testing still has a role in product development and failure investigations. In fact, physical models can work hand-in-hand with simulation in many cases.

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Jul
31

Stress Linearization in ANSYS Workbench compatible with ASME BPVC

Stress Linearization in ANSYS Workbench compatible with ASME BPVCStress linearization is a technique used to decompose a through-thickness elastic stress field into equivalent membrane, bending, and peak stresses for comparison with appropriate allowable limits.

  • Membrane stress is the average stress through the thickness (P/A)
  • Bending stress is the linearly varying stress through the thickness (Mc/I)
  • Peak stress is the total stress minus the membrane plus bending stress

Stress linearization was developed in the pressure vessel industry by Kroenke and Gordon in the 1970s. It was first implemented in Section III (nuclear vessels) and Section VIII, Division 2 (commercial vessels) of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Code. Although widely used in industry thereafter, specific guidance was not included in ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code (BPVC) Section VIII Div. 2 until 2007.

While ANSYS Workbench can be used to validate designs, care must be taken in how the stresses and their locations are handled.

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