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Elements: An Engineering Simulation Blog

Serving the engineering simulation community and ANSYS and Rocky DEM users by sharing news, workshops, seminars, training, webinars, tips & tricks, and more.
Jul
07

Why is Meshing Important for Fluid Simulations?

Meshing has a significant role when it comes to the engineering simulation process. Creating a high-quality mesh is one of the most critical factors that should be considered to ensure simulation accuracy.

What is Meshing?

Meshing is the process in which the continuous geometric space of an object is broken down into thousands or more of shapes to properly define the physical shape of the object. The more detailed a mesh is, the more accurate the 3D CAD model will be, allowing for high fidelity simulations. Meshing, also known as mesh generation, is the process of generating a two-dimensional and three-dimensional grid; it is dividing complex geometries into elements that can be used to discretize a domain. Since meshing typically consumes a significant portion of the time in acquiring simulation results, advanced automated meshing tools can provide faster and more accurate solutions.

Why is Meshing Important?

Creating the most appropriate mesh is the foundation of engineering simulations. The mesh influences the accuracy, convergence, and speed of the simulation. Computers cannot solve simulations on the CAD model’s actual geometry shape as the governing equations cannot be applied to an arbitrary shape. Mesh elements allow governing equations to be solved on predictably shaped and mathematically defined volumes. Typically, the equations solved on these meshes are partial differential equations. Due to the iterative nature of these calculations, obtaining a solution to these equations is not practical by hand, and so computational methods such as Computational Fluid Dynamics are employed.

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Aug
14

Electric Machine Design in ANSYS

As electric machines become smaller and faster, designers face the growing challenge of delivering machines that meet all the electrical, mechanical, and thermal design goals in a very limited timeframe.

Electric machine design in ANSYSElectric Machine AnalysesFor example, in the automotive industry, electrical machines commonly need to be:

  • Compact, given the limited space available
  • Lightweight and Efficient, with increased driving range and extended battery life
  • Quiet, for maximum passenger comfort

With multiple types of analyses required, designers need to seamlessly move from one analysis to another efficiently. And a problem that presents itself downstream may require that upstream analyses be revisited. For instance, if the thermal analysis reveals an overheating issue, then perhaps the upstream electrical analyses needs to be adjusted and the process started again. Furthermore, once an acceptable design is completed, the design may not yet be optimal. It just means that the design is in the ballpark.

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Aug
06

Modeling Mixing Tanks Using ANSYS CFD

In manufacturing settings, a mixing tank is often used to prepare materials for production. Large amounts of materials are put into an enormous tank in order to blend components together through refined mixing.

cfd simulation of mixing tank processCFD Simulation of Mixing Tank Process
Mixing tanks are an important piece of equipment in industries such as:

  • Water/Effluent Treatment
  • Pharma/Bio-Tech
  • Biofuels
  • Cosmetics
  • Oil & Petroleum
  • Mineral Processing
  • Flue Gas Desulpherization
  • Paints & Coatings
  • Adhesives & Sealants
  • Polymer & Plastics
  • Mining
  • Chemical Processing

The $64,000 question for the manufacturer: Do the quality and consistency of the final mixture meet the intended goals? If not, what needs to change? Obviously, the manufacturer can adjust the material inputs, the speed of the mixer, and other factors through trial and error. However, this approach provides information only on the inputs and outputs. If I add so much of product A and so much of product B, and mix at a certain speed for a certain time and at a certain temperature, then I get product C. This method doesn’t offer much information on the actual mixing process itself.

Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulation software can provide much more insight into the mixing process, showing the manufacturer a detailed picture of what is happening inside the tank and how the materials are reacting over time. For example, what if the mixing process could be shortened by 30 seconds? What kind of economic impact would that make?

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